19th Century Oil on Canvas, ‘Dogs Ratting’ attributed to Edward Armfield

$3,500.00

19th Century Oil on Canvas, Dogs Ratting, Attributed to Edward Armfield, Giltwood, Framed, Playful Puppies

Gorgeous diminutive oil on canvas attributed to British artist, Edward Armfield. Depicting three terriers ‘ratting’ in a barn. Gilt frame has been recently touched up. This work has sold at auction as seen on reverse bearing old labels referencing the work to be done by Edward Armfield.

Edward George Armfield
British, (1857-1935)

Edward Armfield was born Edgar Armfield Smith on 27 February, 1857 at Wandsworth, London. He was the son of the animal artist George Armfield (1810-1893) and his second wife Sarah Youens (nee Smith). His grandfather was the artist William Armfield Hobday (1771-1831). His father adopted the name of George Armfield Smith and later went by George Armfield perhaps in an attempt to differentiate himself from his father or distance himself from his family’s bankruptcy. Edward followed suit using the names of Edgar Armfield Smith, Edwin George Armfield and Edward Armfield. Much confusion has arisen over Edward’s dates as a consequence of his father’s adopted names. It is highly likely Edward would have been tutored by his father and probably assisted in his studio, as their styles and subject matter are very similar.

MAKE AN INQUIRY
Close
Inquiry for 19th Century Oil on Canvas, ‘Dogs Ratting’ attributed to Edward Armfield

    SKU: 101-9054 Categories: ,

    Description

    19th Century Oil on Canvas, Dogs Ratting, Attributed to Edward Armfield, Giltwood, Framed, Playful Puppies

    Gorgeous diminutive oil on canvas attributed to British artist, Edward Armfield. Depicting three terriers ‘ratting’ in a barn. Gilt frame has been recently touched up. This work has sold at auction as seen on reverse bearing old labels referencing the work to be done by Edward Armfield.

    Edward George Armfield
    British, (1857-1935)

    Edward Armfield was born Edgar Armfield Smith on 27 February, 1857 at Wandsworth, London. He was the son of the animal artist George Armfield (1810-1893) and his second wife Sarah Youens (nee Smith). His grandfather was the artist William Armfield Hobday (1771-1831). His father adopted the name of George Armfield Smith and later went by George Armfield perhaps in an attempt to differentiate himself from his father or distance himself from his family’s bankruptcy. Edward followed suit using the names of Edgar Armfield Smith, Edwin George Armfield and Edward Armfield. Much confusion has arisen over Edward’s dates as a consequence of his father’s adopted names. It is highly likely Edward would have been tutored by his father and probably assisted in his studio, as their styles and subject matter are very similar.